The name of this animal derives from the Malay word pengguling, meaning what?

The name of this animal derives from the Malay word pengguling, meaning what?

The name of this animal derives from the Malay word pengguling, meaning isone who rolls up. Etymology – The name pangolin comes from the Malay word penggulingmeaning “one who rolls up”.

Daily QuizTime Answers

Question 1- Which international organisation recently released the global Review of Death Penalty?

Answer 1 : (A) Amnesty International

Question 2: Rumana Sinha Sehgal won the World Humanitarian Award 2021 named after which famous personality?

Answer 2 –  (B) Nelson Mandela

Question 3: Which company has launched a $250 million venture fund for India— Smbhav Venture Fund?

Answer 3 – (D) Amazon

Question 4: The name of this animal derives from the Malay word pengguling, meaning what?

Answer 4 – (C) Something that rolls up

Question 5: According to Greek myths, who stole this from the heavens and brought it to Earth?

Answer 5 – (A) Prometheus

Live Quiz Answers:

What is curved from tip to tail and can roll into a ball?

Pangolin!

These solitary, mainly nocturnal animals, are easily recognized by their full armor of scales. A startled pangolin will cover its head with its front legs, exposing its scales to any potential predator. If touched or caught it will completely roll into a ball, while the sharp scales on the tail can be used for whipping.

Also called scaly anteaters because of their preferred diet, pangolins are increasingly becoming victims of illegal wildlife crime for their meat and scales, mainly in Asia and in Africa.

Eight species of pangolin are found on two continents. They range from vulnerable to critically endangered.

Four species live in Africa: the black-bellied pangolin (Phataginus tetradactyla), the white-bellied pangolin (Phataginus tricuspis), the giant ground pangolin (Smutsia gigantea) and the Temminx ground pangolin (Smutsia teminskyi).

Four species found in Asia: Indian pangolin (Manis crassicudata), Philippine pangolin (Manis culionensis), Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica) and Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla).

All eight pangolin species are protected under national and international laws, and two are listed as critically endangered on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

In June 2020, China raised protection for the native Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla) to the highest level, closing a vital loophole for the species’ consumption in the country. Additionally, the government will no longer allow the use of pangolin scales in traditional medicine, a major victory given that in 2019 an estimated 195,000 pangolins were trafficked for their scales alone (Chalender, et al, 2020).

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